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Amy Miller

Committee Clerk, Texas House of Representatives Select Committee on State Sovereignty
2012 | Austin, TX
Purdue University | Political Science
“I was blessed with professors who pushed me past my limits and forced me to bring a novel approach to the study of law. It wasn’t easy, but it was worth it, because now I know that I am capable of handling complicated work without doubting myself.“
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What aspects of your legal education best prepared you for the practice of law?
I was blessed with professors who pushed me past my limits and forced me to bring a novel approach to the study of law. It wasn’t easy, but it was worth it, because now I know that I am capable of handling complicated work without doubting myself.  

How have you used your JD since graduation?
I walked right out of law school and into an incredibly weedy and specialized area of law—Tenth Amendment jurisprudence. The thing about working in Constitutional Law, though, is that you tend to use parts of many areas of law to create cohesive policy that makes sense in the real world. Sometimes I have to hit rewind to 1L to form the big picture, so having that 3 year-sized arsenal of information at my fingertips is an incredible asset. 

What advice would you offer to someone who is thinking about a career in law?
Ask yourself one tough question: do I want to be a lawyer? It’s not an easy job. Being a lawyer means more than just arguing a case, or filing the right paperwork; it means that there’s a good chance that at some point, you’re going to be responsible for the future and livelihood of another human being. Everything I do, I do knowing that it has the potential to affect my boss’s career. It’s an overwhelming feeling, and it’s something you need to be prepared for.

What do you find most rewarding about your work?
The most rewarding thing about doing what I do is that I’m already able to influence upcoming legislation simply by bringing a legal perspective to the policy discussion. Issue spotting is something that lawyers do very well, and it comes in very handy when you’re sitting around a table trying to figure out what exactly it is about a particular statute or policy that isn’t working, and what needs to be done to fix it. Being able to be the person who can stand up and say, “I understand what’s going on and I know how to improve this” is not only rewarding, but incredibly validating.


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