Skip to main content, skip to search, or skip to the top of the page.

The Lori E. Talsky Center for Human Rights of Women and Children
at Michigan State University College of Law and the Michigan State Law Review present:

Symposium on Whether the U.S. Should Become a Party to the U.N. Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women

November 7, 2013 (by invitation only)
East Lansing Marriott at University Place

November 8, 2013
Michigan State University College of Law
Castle Board Room

East Lansing, Michigan

The theme of this symposium is whether the United States should become a party to the U.N. Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW). Almost all countries—187 out of 194—have ratified CEDAW. The seven that have failed to become parties to the treaty are the United States, Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia, Iran, and two small Pacific Island nations (Palau and Tonga).

Not only has the U.S. refusal to ratify CEDAW become a major international embarrassment, but the failure also has deprived American women of the benefits that women elsewhere enjoy under the treaty.

This topic is especially timely now. Consider, for example, the uptick in sexual assaults in the U.S. military, the unanalyzed rape kits sitting in local evidence rooms across the country, and state legislative attempts to roll back women’s reproductive rights. The presenters will discuss ways in which becoming party to CEDAW may provide women in the United States with protection against these and related detrimental developments.


Skip to main content, skip to search, or skip to the top of the page.