Sharron Seaton

Communications Manager, Wayne County Employees' Retirement System

2015 | Detroit, MI

University of Michigan | Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Communication and Media Studies, Psychology

“In the Prisoner’s Rights Clinic, I saw our faculty member on almost a daily basis. We frequently talked about cases, their developments and new things that needed to be done. ”

Sharron Seaton knew MSU College of Law’s clinics would be a great way to get hands-on experience in the field. “Working with clients and representing them is an invaluable way to learn concepts which would otherwise be taught only in the classroom,” she said.

Sharron served as a student clinician in both the Prisoner’s Rights and First Amendment clinics. While at the Prisoner’s Rights clinic, Sharron participated in discovery, drafted legal documents, conducted and defended depositions, and argued motions in federal district court. In the First Amendment clinic, she drafted FOIA requests, and taught high school students weekly workshops on First Amendment law.

“My experiences in each clinic have been vastly different,” she said, “however, they both share one similarity. The way you learn is not to sit in the classroom, read a book and brief cases. It’s hands-on learning, whether you are writing legal documents, representing clients, or teaching classes.”

She described the clinics’ atmospheres as very friendly. “We share thoughts and ideas and have a good time,” Sharron said. “Everyone is willing to help out and contribute. In the Prisoner’s Rights Clinic, I saw our faculty member on almost a daily basis. We frequently talked about cases, their developments and new things that needed to be done. In the First Amendment clinic we are given assignments and we schedule time to meet with our faculty member for feedback on what we've done.”

Sharron used her time at the Prisoner’s Rights clinic to make a lasting difference in the life of one of her clients. “I worked on a case where a man came to prison with an injury and the prison doctors refused to treat him for years,” she said. “He suffered from extreme pain for a long time and it was rewarding to be able to help someone who had nowhere else to go for help.”

Her proudest moment was when she represented her school and clinic in the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. “I prepared for a long time and was very nervous in front of the three judges and opposing counsel, but I articulated my argument well, and it was a big accomplishment.”