Jamie Nichols

Assistant Solicitor 16th Judicial Circuit Solicitor’s Office, DUI Unit

2017 | Rock Hill, SC

“The legal profession needs people with empathy, people who understand different perspectives and different backgrounds, who aren’t judgmental.”

As a student at MSU Law, Jamie Nichols used every available opportunity to help those around him. He served as Parliamentarian for the Black Law Students Association, Vice President of Triangle Bar, Managing Editor of the Journal of Natural Resources, and a member of the Women’s Law Caucus.

“I joined whatever I was interested in,” Nichols said. But he felt a special calling to get involved with Triangle Bar, the law college’s LGBTQ students’ organization. “I was raised in a strict Christian home, and I wasn’t exposed to any other ideology. I evolved my attitude toward LGBTQ rights. I saw that I wasn’t right. Ever since then, I’ve done my best to be an ally for LGBTQ people.” 

Nichols knows that not everyone has progressed in his or her views. “Even since then, not a lot of my childhood friends and family agree with me. They still have that attitude of stigma, so I feel like I have a responsibility. If it ever comes up in a conversation, I need to stop them and say you shouldn’t think like that.”

He sometimes fields questions from acquaintances about what it means to be an ally. “Some people think it’s a little weird to care about LGBTQ issues if you’re not gay, so I try to spread awareness that you can be an ally.”

As a third year law student, Nichols received the Stokes-Hoffman LGBTQ Scholarship in recognition for his work with Triangle Bar. “That was definitely a milestone - to see my progress from what I used to think and how I’ve grown, to have earned a scholarship as an ally of the LGBTQ community. That means a lot to me.”

Nichols listened to those around him in law school, and when his classmate Kate Hall joined the board for the Women’s Law Caucus, she inspired him to join as a member. “Kate sold it wherever she went,” he said. “She described it so beautifully and talked about the importance of women’s rights, and I’m all about equality, so sure, I joined.”

Now, he is a licensed attorney in both North Carolina and South Carolina, and he works as a prosecutor.

He recommends joining student organizations, as he did. “Do community service, get involved. The legal profession needs people with empathy, people who understand different perspectives and different backgrounds, who aren’t judgmental.”